Fuji’s Classic Chrome and the X-Pro 2

Fuji has done some awesome things lately. Their film simulations in camera have been interesting. It started with Fuji introducing Classic Chrome when the X100T came out. They made it a firmware update for the X-T1 also. I was intrigued by it. A lot of people have compared Classic Chrome to Kodak’s iconic Kodachrome film but is it really? You can’t buy Kodachrome anymore so shooting a roll of it and comparing it won’t work. So how do you compare the look of Classic Chrome to the real thing? I searched for the perfect preset for Lightroom to get that…

Kodak TMax 400

Well, this summer kind of got away from me and so did my “Film of the Week” project. No excuses! Anyway, I’m back and this time I shot with Kodak TMax 400 film. TMax is like the staple film of most high school photography courses. Why? Mainly because it’s a very forgiving film, easy to develop and the end results are pretty good. A little about TMax 400. It’s a T-grain film. What is T-grain, you ask? It’s a tabular structure. Here is what Wikipedia says– In panchromatic emulsions, the sensitivity of the silver halide crystal is enhanced by sensitizing dyes that adsorb on the crystal…

Kodak 400TX (TRI-X)

Up this week is the iconic Kodak TRI-X film. Rated at 400 ASA, it’s a fast enough film to capture moving things so that’s probably why it was used so much in photojournalism. Kodak introduced the 35mm film in 1954 and word is that they introduced TRI-X sheet film in the 1940’s. Since I dug a little for Ilford’s history, I’ll do the same for Kodak. When you think of Kodak, if the name George Eastman and Rochester, New York don’t ring a bell, then you don’t know film. Eastman started making dry plates in 1878. Dry plates were a…

Film of the Week

Well, it’s official, I am definitely obsessed with film now. I feel like I’ve gone back in time to when things were much simpler and you had to be a little more patient and a little more creative. I’ve done an article about developing black & white film in your kitchen and have devoted myself to just shooting film for the month of May. But there was something missing. I literally woke up in the middle of the night and decided I wanted to do a Film of the Week series. Crazy! There are a bunch of blog posts and…

Developing B&W Film in the Kitchen

Developing film is actually not a hard process at all. It just takes a little practice and patience to do it and get great results. Of course you need a film camera but those are really inexpensive now and you can get some really good equipment for just a few hundred dollars. Or perhaps you have an old Canon AE-1 or Nikon FE in your closet. Get some film and go for it. I like to use Ilford film. I have for years and the quality is consistent. Maybe because all they make is black and white film. I also…